It's Not What You Say It's How You Say It
10 Songs that Highlight New Yawk
By: Gus Bernadicou
1) "Personality Crisis," The New York Dolls: The opening track of the New York Doll's debut album kicks off with a punch, and then another punch, followed by knock-out body blow. David Johansen screams, and Johnny Thunders guitar attempts to follow the yells. It allowed people to realize how music could sound.
2) "Caroline Says," Lou Reed: "Why is it that you beat me, it isn't any fun." Existentialism through Lou Reed's poetry paints a picture of the reality people tend to avoid. Try to not cry.
3) "Rip Her To Shreds," Blondie: Before Blondie went disco, they went PUNK! Rumored to be about Cherry Vanilla, Deborah Harry shows that she can rock harder than most guys and can do it effortlessly.
4) "Chinese Rocks," Johnny Thunders and the Heartbreakers: Written by Dee Dee Ramones and half of New York, this song becomes the haunting tale of Johnny Thunders legacy.
5) "The Passenger," Iggy Pop: Everything we see is what exists?
6) "The Punk," Cherry Vanilla: Cherry Vanilla is defiantly a house hold name, but most people don't realize that besides being a delicious ice cream flavor she also scooped out a great debut punk album in 1978. By holding the nuts, she kicks major ass and gets the message across that she "wants to rock 'n roll and be a punk."
7) "Rock & Roll Resurrection," Jayne County & the Electric Chairs: in 1978 rock music did need a resurrection, a breath of fresh air, and that that breath came from the mouth Jayne County and the brave people who took it were the smart ones.
8) "Maybe Tomorrow," Mink DeVille: It seems like most songs from the New York era are negative songs, but Mink Deville wrote songs that focused on the hope needed to live life. With help of the who's who of the music industry (Phil Spector's side kick Jack Nitzsche), Willie DeVille sings about the hope of falling into love, maybe, tomorrow.
9) "It's Like Love," The Fast: If the Sparks are one extreme of PowerPop, the Fast are the opposite extreme. It's instantly addicting and features background vocals by Donna Destri.
10) "Wart Hog," The Ramones: Like most things in life you can never be quiet sure what is being said.
Comments Email Gus at gus@punkglobe.com